third party risk management

SIG University Offers Continuing Professional Education Credits for CPAs

SIG University

Certified Professional Accountants (CPAs) who are looking to earn Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits to maintain their licenses can improve their knowledge in third-party risk management by enrolling in SIG University’s Certified Third Party Risk Management Professional (C3PRMP) program.

SIG was recently approved by the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) as a CEP sponsor. The National Registry of CPE Sponsors recognizes and highlights CPE sponsors that provide CPE programs in accordance with nationally recognized standards.

CPA and equivalent designations who enroll in the CPE-track of SIG University’s Certified Third Party Risk Management Professional (C3PRMP) program will receive 66 CPE credits and graduate with a strong knowledge base of third-party risk management best practices that can be implemented immediately.

>>Read More: Certified Third Party Risk Management Professional FAQs<<

What do CPAs Need to Know About Third-Party Risk?

CPAs are in possession of highly sensitive client data that cybercriminals and other bad actors could exploit. This program touches on all areas of operational risk, including cyber, business resilience, financial, technology and reputational risk. Anyone who is serious about investing in their team and protecting the wider enterprise will benefit from the program’s focus on governance and oversight best practices, controls and board reporting with a view from the top.

Stacy Mendoza, Senior Marketing Manager

Aligning Risk Management Tools to Protect Customer Data

SIG University's Certified Third Party Risk Management Professional Program helps protect against company data breaches

SIG University Certified Third Party Risk Management Professional (C3PRMP) Program graduate Cindy Lingerfelt works at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida. She shares what she’s learned about third-party risk management and how her small team plans to build a stronger risk culture.

In the C3PRMP program, students focus on best and emerging practices to identify, assess, manage and control third-party risk throughout the lifecycle of relationships, and learn how to align risk fundamentals and frameworks with risk culture to develop the essential tools and controls for effective governance.


I work for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida on the Procurement team. My sub-team, Supplier Management, is small and we wear many hats. We were the first in our organization to implement some standardization for how critical suppliers were managed by developing a segmentation questionnaire to tier our suppliers and worked with business owners to get all Tier 1 suppliers on performance scorecards. Our role was to provide standard formatted scorecards with a library of the most common KPIs, stationary, QBR templates and more. 

Due to an incident with a supplier, the board made a directive that supplier risk should have a more explicit focus. A new team called Enterprise Risk Management was formed within Corporate Affairs/Internal Audit to address supplier risk and closely partner with Procurement on new suppliers and manage risk with our current supplier base.

Cindy Lingerfelt, C3PRMP, Sourcing Specialist, Florida Blue

Third-Party Risk Management: An Opportunity for Procurement

Risk spelled out on individual colored sticks on a black background.

Hundreds, thousands, or even tens of thousands of third parties power your company every minute of every day, in all your markets and geographies, for every product and service. Third parties are everywhere, in virtually every part of your business. You have less control over third parties than over your internal operations, so getting this right is essential for your company’s success. 

Third-party relationships are complicated. But the “right” third parties, if thoughtfully evaluated, managed and controlled, deliver what you contracted for and serve up many opportunities to be better. Better means new products, services and markets. Better means access to specialized top talent, processes and technology. Better means less risk.

Unfortunately, risk is everywhere and even though technology is advancing in leaps and bounds, operational ecosystems are growing more complex every day. Consequently, risk events, cyber attacks, fraud, data corruption and privacy breaches are becoming commonplace, and are too often the fault of a careless third party. The proliferation of third-party relationships and new technologies means that it’s hard for companies to stay on top of third-party risks, and even harder to implement effective controls, monitoring and oversight.

A New Discipline

Management of third-party risk is a relatively new discipline – involving a new set of skills, rigorous methodologies, well-crafted tools and advanced technologies. But proactive professionals need to learn the language of risk and learn it quickly because everyone is now a risk manager and everyone is responsible for effective and efficient risk management, particularly for critical third parties.

Linda Tuck Chapman, Third Party Management advisor, author, popular speaker & President, Ontala

Is Supply Chain Software Risky Business?

An image of a cloud that conveys cloud computing.

Keynote speakers, thought leaders and industry publications show no signs of slowing when it comes to evangelizing the benefits of the supply chain’s digital transformation. With its promises to save you time and money, the market has exploded with offerings of cloud-based solutions, IoT devices and a legion of outsourced practitioners who can make all of your spend visibility and risk management dreams come true. But for all the benefits touted, what is often left out of the conversation is the topic of security, especially as it relates to third-party vendors.

The Path of Least Resistance

As hackers become cleverer in their approaches, they’ve moved from directly attacking large organizations to exploiting vulnerabilities and penetrating third-party cloud software, apps and IoT devices to implant malware directly into the software or steal login credentials. “The challenge with supply chains is that they are multifaceted and there are many places where a hacker can enter,” says Brandon Curry, Senior Vice President with NTT Communications. Curry, who is also a Certified Ethical Hacker, frequently reports on trends in cloud and supply chain software security. He notes that the top cost of a supply chain breach is legal and reputational costs, with software supply chain attacks costing an average $1.1 million per attack globally.

Compromised software is one of the primary causes of supply chain software breaches, and the damage isn’t limited to grabbing customer credit card numbers or personally identifiable information (PII). Hackers are also looking to steal intellectual property, mine your customer base, counterfeit your product and take over your market share.

Stacy Mendoza, Digital Marketing Manager