supply chain

This Month at SIG - March 2019

This Month at SIG

This month our clocks spring forward and we gain an extra hour of daylight. To make the most of that extra hour, consider attending a networking event, thought leadership webinar or exploring SIG’s new partnership with Everest Group that brings delegates proprietary research, insights and analysis. Ready to get started?

Midwestern Regional SIGnature Event

March 6
Minneapolis Central Library

The Midwestern Regional SIGnature Event takes place at the beautiful Minneapolis Central Library on March 6. The event includes a great lineup of speakers from BB&T, Best Buy, Everest Group, Ontala and Virtual Operations who will present on topics that include third-party risk management, artificial intelligence in procurement, sourcing transformation strategies and how to buy digital platforms for your enterprise.

The event will begin with an executive roundtable for director-level and above delegates, while their teams take part in a training workshop on the fundamentals and frameworks of third-party risk management with risk expert Linda Tuck Chapman, who created the Certified Third Party Risk Management Program for SIG University.

To learn more about the day’s events, speakers, who should attend and to register you and your team, visit our website.

Stacy Mendoza, Digital Marketing Manager

3 Ways Sourcing Professionals Can Proactively Address Risk

Image of a man on a tightrope.

Risk…it’s a four-letter word. And while it is not as offensive as others, it can have a far worse and much longer-lasting impact on an organization. What is most challenging though is that it can come in many forms, making risk mitigation difficult at best and financially devastating at worst. Geopolitical risk, third party vendors, hackers, terrorists, natural disasters, poorly or inadequately trained staff and other circumstances make the global supply chain vulnerable to disruption, costing businesses millions of dollars annually. This is never so apparent as it is after tragedy strikes an area. Consider Hurricane Florence or the Northern California “Camp Fire”— the damage from these devastating events will be long lasting to the communities they impacted and the businesses that supported them.

According to Resilinc’s Eventwatch report, nearly 2,000 supply chain events took place in 2017, representing a 30 percent increase over 2016. Put in context, this translates to roughly five events per day with approximately 25 percent of them requiring an impact notification. Four of the five most significant 2017 supply chain events (in terms of number of supplier sites impacted, number of parts impacted and average time to recovery) were from extreme weather conditions and include late winter storms in the northeast as well as Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria. More than a year later, Caribbean islands like Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands are still trying to recover and will likely see years pass before their economies rebound.

Sarah Holliman, Chief Marketing Officer

4 Things to Know Before you Launch a Category Management Program

An image of white paper airplanes flying in the same direction with one red paper airplane veering off course.

A category management program can put your organization on a path to achieve better outcomes, experience greater savings and result in an increased focus on collaboration and innovation. But launching a category management program is not just as simple as flipping a switch.

In our blog post, The Guide to Understanding Category Management, we provided you with a template to develop a business case for category management in a specific spend category and noted that category management is not to be confused with strategic sourcing, although it evolved from the overall strategic sourcing approach.

Before we jump head first into creating our category management program, there are some important considerations to take into account. The Hackett Group (Hackett) and GEP recommend addressing the following four critical needs for an effective program, which are summarized below.

>>Click here for everything you need to know about achieving greater value with a global category strategy.

#1: Create an organizational design to best meet the needs of procurement and the business.

Getting visibility into spend analytics is one of the first steps to implementing a successful and sustainable category management program. Then, with your spend data in place, you can begin to develop your category management plan.

Stacy Mendoza, Digital Marketing Specialist

Supply Chain Mobility: Sourcing Tomorrow’s Business

There’s a lot of talk regarding all the ways technology is going to revolutionize procurement. Blockchain can increase supply chain visibility, the Internet of Things (IoT) can change the way our business devices communicate with each other, etc…But what type of innovations are available at the sourcing level?

From paper RFPs to conferences, it seems the way we source business has largely remained the same. Procurement teams are limited to siloed, outdated supplier databases and incomplete business information when attempting to make business decisions. It’s expensive and time-consuming to get a holistic picture of a supplier’s business health and mitigate third-party risk. How can we adapt today’s technology for tomorrow’s sourcing needs? Here are a few innovative ways that your organization can source business:

Daryl Hammett, CSMP, CSP, General Manager/Chief Operating Officer, ConnXus