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A User’s Guide to the Gig Economy for Procurement Practitioners - Part 1

How procurement can make the gig economy work for them.

The gig economy has been talked about so extensively that the term has become nearly meaningless. Yet contingent workforce and services procurement practitioners know there is something going on beyond the buzzwords, something that is beginning to matter to the work they do. It is difficult, however, for many practitioners to distinguish what is essential and of importance in the context of their procurement goals. To aid in that effort, this Spend Matters’ brief explores how practitioners can make the gig economy work for them.

This two-part brief is available to readers as part of SIG and Spend Matters ongoing partnership

Read part two.


Deconstructing the Gig Economy

Based on a cursory look at Google Trends data, it is clear that the interest in the gig economy has risen consistently since the summer of 2015. No such increase occurred for terms like “contingent workforce” or “temporary labor” since 2004. But let’s take a closer look at how the gig economy is being described. 

Definitions of what constitutes gig economy work range from:

Andrew Karpie, Research Director for Services and Labor Procurement, Spend Matters

A User’s Guide to the Gig Economy for Procurement Practitioners - Part 2

How procurement can make the gig economy work for them.

In part one of this brief, we deconstructed the meaning behind the buzz word “gig economy” and explored what these new digital supply chains look like. In part two, we’re addressing the potential value opportunities, risks and challenges associated with digital supply chains for work and services and how practitioners can make the gig economy work for them.

This two-part brief is available to readers as part of SIG and Spend Matters ongoing partnership.

Click here to read part one.


What is the potential for value, risk and challenges of digital supply chains?

The conditions we discussed in part one of this brief present contingent workforce and services procurement with a new set of potential value opportunities, risks and challenges. 

As with pushing ahead with most innovative approaches, achieving value means confronting, evaluating and, where possible, addressing risks and execution challenges.

Value, Risks and Challenges

Andrew Karpie, Research Director for Services and Labor Procurement, Spend Matters