best practices

SIG Speaks to Kate Renwick-Espinosa

Kate Renwick-Espinosa headshot over the property of the Omni La Costa Resort hotel

Kate Renwick-Espinosa is the President of VSP Vision Care, a national not-for-profit vision company. At SIG's Fall Global Executive Summit, Kate will highlight how organizations can adopt a culture of fiscal fitness through impactful activities, engaging content pushed through a variety of communication channels, and a tighter alignment between leadership and different groups. Leveraging more than 27 years of optical and leadership experience, she’s energized by helping people see and feels fortunate to work for a company with similar “care and service” values. She’s accountable and committed to growing VSP membership and product and service offerings to meet diverse consumer needs and VSP’s client base.


Can you share a little more about your day-to-day role and responsibilities as the President of VSP Vision Care?

Helping people see is what motivates me every day. My primary focus is to help lead the direction and key efforts for the company that continue to grow and strengthen our VSP membership. This means we’re aligned and structured to be wherever the customer is making their vision care “purchase” and “care” decisions.  Our product and service offerings must meet diverse and personalized consumer needs as well as VSP’s client base both domestic and international. And, they must be straight-forward and easy to use!

I also work closely with our CEO, and entire leadership team, to ensure our growing company is connected and supporting our common goals and essentials as well as delivering a consistent and competitive marketplace presence. Together we ensure that when we all show up to work that we clearly understand where we’re trying to get to and how we make a difference. Collectively across our six lines of business, we’re delivering the kind of personalized eye care experience that creates members for life!

Stacy Mendoza, Digital Marketing Manager

Statement of Work: Best Practices for Supplemental Staffing

Group of businesspeople over a table agreeing on a statement of work

There is no question that the world of work is changing. With artificial intelligence (AI), blockchain and robotic process automation (RPA), to name a few, technologies are disrupting the industry in radical ways. When you factor in the retirement of Baby Boomers, the advancement of Millennials into management positions and the proliferation of globalization, the face of the workforce is profoundly different. In addition, over the past 40 years – more so over the past 20 – the concept of working at one company for a person’s entire career has become completely foreign. You would be hard-pressed to find someone who graduated from college any time after 2000 who is still with the same company they initially joined. It’s not your father’s – or dare I say, grandfather’s workforce anymore.

Perhaps the biggest change to the landscape of all is that over 41.5% of the workforce is represented by contingent workers, which brings its own set of challenges. This particular dynamic can have legal implications, making it more important than ever to begin those relationships with clearly defined expectations. With such a large portion of the workforce considered “non-employee” (which includes independent contractors, temp labor, freelance personnel and other gig economy workers), it is more critical than ever to carefully frame expectations.

Sarah Holliman, CEO, Cantaré Creative

8 Keys to Ensure Ethical Sourcing Standards

An image of gears with text overlay that has ethical statements.

In my last blog, I spoke about ethical sourcing and the many benefits it can have for your company. Seems like a no-brainer, right? When attempting to put in a plan to obliterate unethical practices in your supply chain, it starts to be risky business. The best way to mitigate risk is to set up a solid plan and be diligent about following through with it. 

In my research to find a clear plan to mitigate unethical practices, I found a slew of proposed methods. Unfortunately, I felt that many of them seemed too simple—basically, too easy and too good to be true. I finally came across a solid and thorough plan proposed by Declan Kearney, the founder of 360° Supplier View, who shares tips with companies to ensure ethical sourcing practices in their supply chain.

Do Your Research

Make sure you do your research on your suppliers…and their suppliers. With myriad complex regulations now put in place, go out and learn from case studies and the resources that will act as a survival guide as you attempt to research your vendors and suppliers.

Stay Away from the Fat Cat

Assess whether the higher-ups in your supplier organization are well known or politically aligned. These individuals are more susceptible to bribery or corruption.

Hailey Corr, Junior Editor and Marketing Associate, Outsource and SIG

How Best-In-Class Procurement Organizations Are Driving Their Category Management Implementation

A futuristic image of a city at night.

Given the intensity with which companies today are focusing on innovation and profitable growth, it is imperative that procurement teams drive strategies that support enterprise-level business goals. Beyond traditional sourcing approaches, strategic category management delivers a collaborative way of developing solutions that support both business and category objectives. Category management maximizes category value to the organization, delivering on critical parameters such as total cost of ownership, risk and performance, to name a few.

While procurement organizations around the world realize the significance of building an advanced category management program, getting there isn’t simple. In a number of organizations today, category management is still at a nascent stage, perhaps indicating that though there is an organizational structure for category management, it is not quite aligned with the business strategy. For many though, exhausted sourcing strategies turn out to be their biggest hindrance.

To address this issue, GEP and SIG have teamed up for a webinar with Biju Mohan, vice president of GEP Consulting, to discuss the latest trends influencing strategic category management program design and implementation by global, market-leading procurement organizations.

Key topics include:

Edie Sachs, Senior Marketing and Content Manager, GEP