benchmarking

Are Your Procurement KPIs Balanced or Obsolete? - Part 2

KPIs for CPOs, Procurement benchmarking

In Part 1 of this series on procurement’s key performance indicators (KPIs), we discussed how legacy KPIs need to be augmented to help procurement expand its value proposition. In this second installment of the series, we’ll focus on how to build a balanced “360-degree” procurement scorecard and highlight some truly KEY performance indicators that help foster the right behaviors and alignment across the source-to-pay (S2P) process and the broader value chain.

This two-part brief is available to readers as part of SIG and Spend Matters ongoing partnership.

Click here to read part one.


KPIs: Become What You Measure

Everyone knows the old adage, “What you measure is what you get.” Known as the “Hawthorne Effect,” it has been shown that performance will improve when those performing the process know they’re getting measured on it. So, designing stakeholder-specific KPIs is critical to ensuring business alignment. The “SMART” (specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and timely) metrics model is an excellent framework to apply here. Still, the first step is ensuring a 360-degree measurement system that aligns procurement with:

Pierre Mitchell, Spend Matters’ Chief Research Officer

This Month at SIG - July 2018

A woman working on a remote island.

Here at the SIG headquarters, we’re working hard to provide you with an exciting line-up of fall events and thought leadership. Whether you plan to spend July taking some much-needed time off or your goal is to wrap up some big projects, SIG is here to support you in your day-to-day responsibilities. Register for one of our upcoming webinars that cover today’s latest trends in the industry or listen to our thought-provoking podcast on your commute or a work trip.

You can stay up-to-the-minute with all things SIG by following us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook. Here’s what’s happening in July:

CPO Virtual Forum

On July 19, senior procurement executives are invited to join SIG and Oliver Wyman for an exclusive CPO Virtual Forum. CPO Virtual Forums are one-hour, single-topic sessions in which CPOs gather online to openly discuss their most pressing issues. Facilitated by Oliver Wyman, the forum will generate actionable next-steps to discuss during the CPO Roundtable held at the Fall Global Executive Summit in Rancho Mirage, California, October 15-18.

This interactive presentation will be delivered in an open-mic, collaborative format via WebEx that will not be recorded to ensure candid conversations. The topic for this Virtual Forum will be "Procurement Rebranded: Leveraging the Wisdom of Brands to Produce a Star Function." Visit our website for the full session description and to register, but you must hurry – space is limited!

Stacy Mendoza, Digital Marketing Specialist

Sustainability in Sourcing Part II: Sourcing's Role

An image of a glass globe in the forest.

In previous blogs, SIG has covered the basic concept of sustainability, including an overview of its various dimensions. In this post, I will touch on the role that sourcing professionals can have in meeting corporate sustainability goals.

Why should sourcing have a role?

Sourcing is uniquely positioned to contribute to meeting a corporation's sustainability goals because sourcing typically has expertise in:

  • Creating alignment to corporate goals
  • Building frameworks to measure success
  • Researching market conditions and supplier capabilities
  • Conducting strategic negotiations 
  • Designing innovative methods for value creation
  • Ranking the priorities of stakeholders with supplier offerings   
  • Identifying risk and mitigating responsibly

The reduction in costs after implementing a sustainability program can exceed the costs of implementation – in other words, you’re spending money up front but in the long run, you save more than you spend. For example, if an organization were to target the spend category of corporate services and facilities management (FM), capital may be invested in working with a supplier to install a new system that reduces energy consumption at the company's North American headquarters, but in the long run, the reduction in energy costs saves the company money – which of course, can then be reinvested.

In this example, procurement and sourcing are uniquely positioned to make this happen. Most likely Sourcing negotiated the original FM contract, understands the innovative capabilities of suppliers, has heard many recent pitches on new products, and is adept at performing the analysis that proves an investment can have a significant return in hard costs, and even soft costs.

Mary Zampino, Senior Director of Global Sourcing Intelligence