SIG Speaks Blog

Collaborating in the Cloud: Where Procurement Process Meets Social Networking

The "cloud" is allowing Procurement organizations to engage beyond their four walls with peer organizations - for benchmarking and collaborative buying - and with suppliers for new product innovations and supply chain efficiencies. Procurement organizations have long focused most of their attention on getting their own houses in order...streamlining internal transactional processes to promote efficiency, realigning organizational resources to focus more on strategic and less on tactical or transactional activities...all for the betterment of their organizations. With foundational internal platforms and processes in place, more organizations will begin utilizing the cloud to get connected outside their enterprises in a number of new and exciting ways. Cloud technologies make it easier than ever before to collaborate with external enterprises – both suppliers and their peer group. And according to Capgemini Consulting, procurement needs to rapidly shift their attention to supplier collaboration, especially early involvement in new product introduction, in order to drive innovation: "Organizations are still reluctant to involve procurement and suppliers early enough in product development and innovation. And Procurement is still viewed as a silo function with KPIs that remain focused on tactical and cost reduction activities." While 80% of more than 1,000 CPOs surveyed by Capgemini concede that suppliers are involved too late in the corporate innovation process, they recognize that suppliers contribute value beyond the products and services they provide, both in terms of the quantity, speed and agility with which they provide them:

Richard Waugh, Vice President, Corporate Development, Zycus Inc.

Professional Development: It's Not What You Know...It's Knowing You Don't Know It All

I recently had a sneak peek at Dawn's "President's Message" in our latest (soon-to-be-released as of this posting) InsideSourcing newsletter. In a nutshell, she talked about the fact that SIG is not just a "membership" organization, but should more appropriately be thought of as a "training" organization — a place where professionals come to learn more about the latest best practices in sourcing, outsourcing, procurement and so much more. Read her newsletter article for the many things SIG provides in the way of training — I won’t restate it all here — but I would like to expound a bit on the benefits of engaging in professional development for yourself and your team: It exposes you to the latest innovations. When you attend classes, conferences or events, you gain access to new ways of thinking. Sure, you can read about new innovations online, but the most tangible way to learn is to hear how someone has applied best and worst (more on that below) practices. You learn from other industries. At a recent SIG Summit, we had a speaker, Stephen Shapiro who extolled the virtues not of "thinking outside the box," but rather in "finding a better box." What does that mean? Well for one thing, sometimes looking inside your industry for all the answers may not be the best place to find them. If you attend a conference where many sectors are present, you might just have an "aha!" moment by hearing how people in other industries have approached, applied and solved problems. It motivates your team. Don't underestimate how important it is to provide your team with opportunities to network and learn. Sure, you might offer courses in-house, but imagine what it means to your team to give them the chance to meet peers in other organizations and hear the latest innovations.

Sarah Holliman

Mining Data to Boost Revenue in the Networked Economy

We live in a networked economy. As consumers, we tap into personal networks to learn, share and shop better. And with increasing frequency, companies are harnessing the insights and intelligence of business networks to break down the barriers to collaboration and drive innovation and competitive advantage. Like social networks, business networks are an efficient, effective way to connect with a global network of partners and transact business. And they have fast become the defacto standard for a number of key processes, such as sourcing. But the real power of business networks lies in what goes on inside them – all the interactions, transactions and commentary, and the massive amounts of insights and data that they generate. And innovative companies are leveraging this information to move beyond simply transacting and engaging with partners in new ways that give them a leg up on the competition. Take MSC Industrial Supply Co., a leading distributor of Metalworking and Maintenance, Repair and Operations ("MRO") solutions, services and supplies to North American manufacturers. More than a decade ago, MSC joined a network to provide its customers with a fast and efficient way to find and purchase the products they needed. Today, the company is taking things to the next level, mining the insights, intelligence and transaction data that reside on the network to help its customers run their businesses with greater efficiency and effectiveness. When MSC learned that employees at one of its customers' locations had to walk a mile to get to a centralized storeroom where supply replacements were housed, it suggested they install vending machines to put inventory closer to where the work was being done. In doing so, MSC enabled its customer to save time and money, making it a more strategic and valuable partner. In their initial phase, networks were all about connecting companies so that they could buy and sell more efficiently.

Dr. Chakib Bouhdary, President, Business Networks, SAP

Lessons Learned from the World Cup

The world is in a soccer (or should I say "futbol") frenzy right now. Every day the best teams in the world are competing for their country in hard-fought matches where the team advancing might be determined in the final few seconds of a game. In the U.S vs. Portugal game, the U.S. was the only team in their group Sunday that could have advanced to the knockout round with a win. Instead, their fate is still up in the air, with a number of possible outcomes. This got me thinking about the lessons we could learn from the World Cup.

Leadership is key. It is easy to credit a coach or team captain with leadership, but if there is one thing I've learned in the past few years, it is that anyone can be a leader—it is not defined by your title. This is evident in any soccer game in the world at any given time. Just listen to players talking to one another on a field. Often it's the goalie or center back defender shouting instructions. They may have a lay of the land that someone in a striking position can't see. I think of the Procurement group the same way—it is often the only department that has regular communication with virtually every other business unit, allowing it insight at a high-level that is difficult for any other department to replicate.

Sarah Holliman

The Impact of Leadership on Procurement Organizations

There is one common, less noticed trait about all companies with successful supply chain operations; they know the value of an effective procurement organization, and have placed a great deal of emphasis in creating/transforming them around a strategic vision. However, only a small percentage of businesses globally can claim this success. Most companies lack the vision and thus have seen their procurement organizations evolve organically, developing around the needs of the time and constraints of supporting revenue growth. This blog post provides insights into what defines the second type of companies and how change at the top, supported by long-term vision, can help a firm change for the better. Businesses have developed practices of utilizing the resources and teams available to them to focus on their immediate needs. With top lines receiving a significant emphasis, procurement organizations have been asked to focus on getting the right material in time, but rarely on quality and best cost. Alternatively, when bottom line results are at risk, procurement teams have been asked to generate additional savings to meet quarterly or annual targets. It is only during times of extreme commodity price volatility and spikes in cost of goods sold (COGS), that teams are created to focus on managing commodity risks and price fluctuations. Competitive forces, lessons learned and recommendations from resources new to the firm or from consultants typically drive the situations described above. However, these are implemented as stand-alone projects and rarely translate to a long-term strategic vision. Procurement and Corporate leadership seldom evaluate a procurement organization from a holistic viewpoint.

Samir Patel, Director, GEP

Networking for the Feint of Heart

I've read a lot lately about networking. It's a "must do" for any professional career...but for SIG, it's the difference between success and failure. SIG is defined by our ability to provide opportunities for our members to share best practices and thought leadership. How? By connecting them with other sourcing, outsourcing and procurement professionals. We offer online opportunities with Webinars, Town Hall Teleconferences and P2Ps (Peer-to-Peer resources), and of course with live events, such as Global Summits, Symposiums and Regional Roundtables. This week alone we've had one Symposium (in Toronto), a Regional Roundtable in Chicago (at McDonald's Hamburger University...how cool is that?!), a Town Hall Teleconference two Webinars and two P2Ps. It's a busy week—but it's what our members need to hear the latest industry standards and benchmark with others in this function. We love what we do and we try to make our events hassle-free and accessible. But based on some of the articles I've recently read, I'm reminded that live networking is not something that comes easily to most people. In fact, some of the best public speakers I know absolutely cringe when they have to mingle. So what can you do to enhance your networking outcome when you are at a conference or an event?

Sarah Holliman

Business Outcomes for Procuring Value Beyond Cost Savings

"Price is what you pay. Value is what you get." - Warren Buffett So you think you've seen it all in sourcing and procurement? Have you tried to weed out real value beyond cost savings? Just because you are saving money doesn't mean you've driven value for your organization. It might seem to be amorphous and unaccountable, but the "value" of a deal or contract is definable by the stakeholders in your organization. Find out what they want, and you find what drives "value" in your company. When you know what someone wants, you can negotiate based on that. Maybe "value" is measured in time. Maybe it's measured in contract commitments. Maybe your supplier needs goods or services you have, that can be applied in barter or through profit sharing. Procurement has matured into more than just negotiating the best contract for the best price. The creativity and innovation that can spur both value and savings comes from doing deals that exceed the simple exchange of dollars for services. Here are a few things to consider when putting together a deal: Deal summary – create an overview of the deal:

  • Where did it start, how did it evolve?
  • Who is the customer (if there even is one)?
  • What is the desired outcome?

Intangibles to consider:

Celia De Benedetti

Predictive Analytics Replace Reactive

Leading procurement organizations will increasingly be able to anticipate future spending patterns rather than just analyze historical spending, and will be able to prevent supply risk failures, such as supply chain disruptions, before they occur.

When it comes to analyzing historical spend data, there already exists a major divide between world class and non-world class. Looking at a "significant amount" of spend visibility company-wide, the gap is getting bigger: 23% more world class had this level of spend visibility overall in 2012, and the gap more than doubled in 2013 to 47%, when 89% of world-class organizations achieved this mark overall. Top performing organizations also have better visibility as to how their suppliers are currently performing. In 2013, 80% of world class performers were utilizing a formal, supplier scoring methodology as compared to just 50% of the total peer group, according to Hackett Group benchmarks. Going forward, these leading organizations will seek to further extend their advantage by leveraging spend and supplier analytics in more proactive and predictive ways, for example:

Richard Waugh, Vice President, Corporate Development, Zycus Inc.

14 Ways the Workplace is Evolving - Is Your Corporate Culture Keeping Up?

As corporate cultural battles play out, workplaces have become the battleground, with outcomes increasingly dependent on worker engagement, health, well-being and a sense of belonging or purpose. The following are 14 workplace trends reshaping corporate cultures in 2014 and beyond:

Bernice Boucher

What Inspires You?

Editor's Note: We saw a longer version of this blog a few months ago and were inspired by the support that Beeline provides to the global community. We asked if we could share it with the SIG community to inspire other companies to do more and/or to share what they do. Please read below...be inspired...and share your own wonderful work with us!

What Inspires You? I have been thinking about this question for several months now, no doubt due to the "Be Inspired" theme from the 2013 Beeline Conference. After hearing from such amazing speakers like Derreck Kayonga (the Global Soap Project) and Robert X. Fogarty (the Dear World project), I felt overwhelmingly inspired. See photo where SIG's own Dawn Evans participated in the Deear World project.


 

Their projects have affected countless lives around the world, which really got me thinking about Beeline's philanthropy. Every day at Beeline, my colleagues make a choice to place an importance on giving back to the community. One thing is certain: I am inspired by the generosity of others.

Typhoon Relief After thousands lost their lives (and countless remain homeless) from the typhoon that struck the Philippines in November 2013, Beeline immediately set up a fund to support relocation and rebuilding efforts. The Beeline office located in Manila spent a Saturday packing supplies for the victims of this typhoon and made the decision to cut certain budgeted items. Feeling inspired to help, several Filipino colleagues in the Beeline Jacksonville office immediately set up a Typhoon Donation Luncheon and made traditional Filipino food. Between both offices' efforts, Beeline raised $9,564.47 to support this effort.

Marci LaValley,

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