Technology

SIG Speaks to Bruce Morton, Global Head of Strategy, Allegis Global Solutions

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Bruce is a distinguished thought leader and global innovator, with over three decades’ experience within the human capital and workforce management industry. In his current role, Bruce is involved in new services and product idea generation, sales presentations, internal and external evangelism, digital and social media strategies, and lead generation. He gives us an inside look into his role, how he acts as a key partner to the business and his outlook on the future of work.

Your CPO keynote presentation at the Denver CPO Meet and Eat is about leveraging spend management within services categories--why is this an important topic?

There is a lot of talk about spend analytics, data and how that is the future of success. Our position is that spend analytics is a wonderful tool and capability but we’ve yet to see the capability evolve beyond goods-level detail.  As procurement teams are continuing to try to find ways to better address services spend and deliver value to their organizations, we feel that there is tremendous opportunity by thinking differently about this space.

Can you share a little more about your day-to-day role and responsibilities as the Global Head of Strategy for Allegis Global Solutions (AGS)?

Stacy Mendoza, Digital Marketing Specialist

The Shifting Cyber Threat Landscape

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With the rapid acceleration of cloud software, Internet of Things (IoT) and advancements in FinTech, the financial and technology industries saw significant increases in cyberattacks over the past year. Attackers find vulnerabilities in supply chains and software, capitalize on lax security updates and use social engineering to manipulate end-users.

As hackers become more creative in their subversive techniques, businesses need to become more proactive in educating their workforce and stepping up their cyber incident response plans. Businesses should consult with their vendors, third-party suppliers and stakeholders in every business unit to ensure continuity, mitigate risk and verify that security measures are being employed and regularly updated.    

Below are summarized findings from the recent NTT Security Global Threat Intelligence Report that focus specifically on the finance and technology sectors in the Americas, which account for the most highly targeted attack sectors in this region. Recommendations from the National Institute of Standards and Technology Framework are included here as well. Organizations can also look to the Department of Homeland Security’s National Cyber Incident Response Plan for guidance on dealing with and addressing cyber incidents. 

Finance and Technology Top the List of Targets

Attacks to the finance sector nearly tripled, accounting for 43 percent of attacks compared with 15 percent the previous year. Attacks targeted at the technology industry sector increased to 27 percent of attacks, up from 11 percent in the previous year. For comparison, manufacturing was the most attacked sector in 2016, with 23 percent of attacks, but has since fallen to five percent of attacks in 2017.

Stacy Mendoza, Digital Marketing Specialist

Sustainability in Sourcing Part II: Sourcing's Role

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In previous blogs, SIG has covered the basic concept of sustainability, including an overview of its various dimensions. In this post, I will touch on the role that sourcing professionals can have in meeting corporate sustainability goals.

Why should sourcing have a role?

Sourcing is uniquely positioned to contribute to meeting a corporation's sustainability goals because sourcing typically has expertise in:

  • Creating alignment to corporate goals
  • Building frameworks to measure success
  • Researching market conditions and supplier capabilities
  • Conducting strategic negotiations 
  • Designing innovative methods for value creation
  • Ranking the priorities of stakeholders with supplier offerings   
  • Identifying risk and mitigating responsibly

The reduction in costs after implementing a sustainability program can exceed the costs of implementation – in other words, you’re spending money up front but in the long run, you save more than you spend. For example, if an organization were to target the spend category of corporate services and facilities management (FM), capital may be invested in working with a supplier to install a new system that reduces energy consumption at the company's North American headquarters, but in the long run, the reduction in energy costs saves the company money – which of course, can then be reinvested.

In this example, procurement and sourcing are uniquely positioned to make this happen. Most likely Sourcing negotiated the original FM contract, understands the innovative capabilities of suppliers, has heard many recent pitches on new products, and is adept at performing the analysis that proves an investment can have a significant return in hard costs, and even soft costs.

Mary Zampino, Senior Director of Global Sourcing Intelligence

How Best-In-Class Procurement Organizations Are Driving Their Category Management Implementation

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Given the intensity with which companies today are focusing on innovation and profitable growth, it is imperative that procurement teams drive strategies that support enterprise-level business goals. Beyond traditional sourcing approaches, strategic category management delivers a collaborative way of developing solutions that support both business and category objectives. Category management maximizes category value to the organization, delivering on critical parameters such as total cost of ownership, risk and performance, to name a few.

While procurement organizations around the world realize the significance of building an advanced category management program, getting there isn’t simple. In a number of organizations today, category management is still at a nascent stage, perhaps indicating that though there is an organizational structure for category management, it is not quite aligned with the business strategy. For many though, exhausted sourcing strategies turn out to be their biggest hindrance.

To address this issue, GEP and SIG have teamed up for a webinar with Biju Mohan, vice president of GEP Consulting, to discuss the latest trends influencing strategic category management program design and implementation by global, market-leading procurement organizations.

Key topics include:

Edie Sachs, Senior Marketing and Content Manager, GEP

The Innovative CPO’s Road Map

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Procurement has evolved to become more strategic and collaborative and has moved from an isolated, back-office function to a boardroom partner. While the procurement function must continue to drive hard savings, manage suppliers and mitigate risk, it must also pivot to look for opportunities to deliver future savings and innovation.  

“Procurement is at an inflection point,” said Dr. Marcell Vollmer in a recent interview with SIG CEO Dawn Tiura. “Procurement needs to transform into a value-added function focusing on strategic tasks.” How can procurement teams do this?  

Based on interviews with today’s leading procurement executives, innovative suppliers and academic research on the procurement function, five notable areas stand out in which procurement can drive innovation in areas critical to the sourcing industry.  

INVEST IN THE RIGHT TALENT

For all the great advancements that technology brings, it requires people to manage the technology. Oxford Economics’ survey among procurement executives and practitioners found that the top three investment priorities include new talent recruitment, training/upskilling programs and procurement/supply-chain technology.  

Oxford Economics Survey

Stacy Mendoza, Digital Marketing Specialist

Interview with Ryan A. Murray, New York City Mayor's Office of Contract Services

Ryan Murray, First Deputy Director in the Mayor's Office of Contract Services for the City of New York

Ryan A. Murray is the First Deputy Director in the Mayor's Office of Contract Services for the City of New York. He manages an oversight and service agency that was responsible for $21 billion in procurement in FY17. New York City operates a federated model with an estimated 2,000 staff and evolving technology landscape. Mr. Murray leads the people and change practice, serves as the chief strategy officer and guides the legislative/policy agenda for the Mayor's Office of Contract Services.

 
Mr. Murray, who provided the keynote presentation at the New York City CPO Meet and Eat, shares how he is leading the transformation journey for the Mayor's Office of Contract Services to make the procurement and sourcing functions more efficient.  
 

What kind of transformation did you help the Mayor’s Office achieve and how was success measured?

Doing business with the City should be easy and internal city procurement operations should be efficient. Disparate practices across industries, a federated model, rigid bureaucratic rules and heavy reliance on paper processes impede the realization of quality experience by vendors and agencies. That’s why we are implementing a multi-year project to overhaul operations. In 2017 we reached the first critical milestone by launching the Procurement and Sourcing Solutions Portal (PASSPort). Together with our technology and implementation partners, we introduced centralized supplier management, moving a cumbersome vendor disclosures process online, establishing a shared platform for data sharing across agencies and allowing vendors to access contract performance data in the same portal. This success enables us to develop and launch requisitioning, sourcing and payment modules in the next two years.

Stacy Mendoza, Digital Marketing Specialist